Hacks

shame.css, or documenting your hacks

You’d be forgiven for thinking the point of this whole exercise is to shame the developers (you can always pick a name other than shame.css) but it’s really not. I am well aware of (and responsible for) hacks and quick fixes; your product owner doesn’t care if you used an !important, they just want the new feature out of the door. Hacks happen, fact.

shame.css is jokingly titled to make it a little light-hearted whilst also indicating that anything in there is a bit of a shame; a shame to have to have done, a shame to pollute the codebase with and so on…

By isolating all your hacks and bodge-jobs in their own file you can really easily keep tabs on them; isolating them isn’t to shame the developers, not at all, it’s merely to make the team aware of them and make them painfully, unmissably obvious.

The rules

Obviously you need some kind of rules and criteria:

  1. If it’s a hack, it goes in shame.css.
  2. Document all hacks fully:
    1. What part of the codebase does it relate to?
    2. Why was this needed?
    3. How does this fix it?
    4. How might you fix it properly, given more time?
  3. Do not blame the developer; if they explained why they had to do it then their reasons are probably (hopefully) valid.
  4. Try and clean shame.css up when you have some down time.
    1. Even better, get a tech-debt story in which you can dedicate actual sprint time to it.

This certainly seems like a good approach. That said, I personally prefer to have everything related to a component living with the component, but documented as a hack, possibly searchable via some sort of comment tag, like @hack <description>.

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