CSS - Animation

CSS Motion Path

Motion Path is a CSS module that allows authors to animate any graphical object along a custom path.

The idea is that when you want to animate an element moving along a path, you previously only had animating translation, position, etc. at your disposal, which wasn’t ideal and only allowed for simple movements. With offset-path you can define a specific path of any shape you want. You then animate it along that path by animating offset-distance, and can choose to rotate it at any point using offset-rotate.

Code language: CSS

#motion-demo {
  offset-path: path('M20,20 C20,100 200,0 200,100');
  animation: move 3000ms infinite alternate ease-in-out;
  width: 40px;
  height: 40px;
  background: cyan;
}
 
@keyframes move {
  0% {
    offset-distance: 0%;
  }
  100% {
    offset-distance: 100%;
  }
}

Revisiting prefers-reduced-motion, the reduced motion media query

Two years ago, I wrote about prefers-reduced-motion, a media query introduced into Safari 10.1 to help people with vestibular and seizure disorders use the web. The article provided some background about the media query, why it was needed, and how to work with it to avoid creating disability-triggering visual effects.

The article was informed by other people’s excellent work, namely Orde Saunders’ post about user queries, and Val Head’s article on web animation motion sensitivity.

We’re now four months into 2019, and it makes me happy to report that we have support for the feature in all major desktop browsers! Safari was first, with Firefox being a close second. Chrome was a little late to the party, but introduced it as of version 74.

[…]

Reduce isn’t necessarily remove

We may not need to throw the baby out with the bathwater when it comes to using animation. Remember, it’s prefers-reduced-motion, not prefers-no-motion.

[…]

If the meaning of a component is diminished by removing its animation altogether, we could slow down and simplify the component’s animation to the point where the concept can be communicated without potentially being an accessibility trigger.

FLIP.js

FLIP is an approach to animations that remaps animating expensive properties, like width, height, left and top to significantly cheaper changes using transforms. It does this by taking two snapshots, one of the element’s First position (F), another of its Last position (L). It then uses a transform to Invert (I) the element’s changes, such that the element appears to still be in the First position. Lastly it Plays (P) the animation forward by removing the transformations applied in the Invert step.

Animating with Clip-Path

clip-path is one of those CSS properties we generally know is there but might not reach for often for whatever reason. It’s a little intimidating in the sense that it feels like math class because it requires working with geometric shapes, each with different values that draw certain shapes in certain ways.

We’re going to dive right into clip-path in this article, specifically looking at how we can use it to create pretty complex animations. I hope you’ll see just how awesome the property and it’s shape-shifting powers can be.

Splitting - text animation library

A stylized "Splitting" with a banana mascot.
That's one determined banana.

Splitting creates elements and adds CSS variables to unlock amazing possibilities for animating text, grids, and more!

DoubleDash your CSS

The previously impractical becomes easy with Splitting’s CSS Variables.

Comically Small

A shocking amount of features in a 1.5kb (minified & gzipped) package.

Progressively Enhance

Upgrade websites for modern browsers without breaking IE.

Responsive Design for Motion, a.k.a. "prefers-reduced-motion" Media Query

WebKit now supports the prefers-reduced-motion media feature, part of CSS Media Queries Level 5, User Preferences. The feature can be used in a CSS @media block or through the window.matchMedia() interface in JavaScript. Web designers and developers can use this feature to serve alternate animations that avoid motion sickness triggers experienced by some site visitors.

To explain who this media feature is for, and how it’s intended to work, we’ll cover some background. Skip directly to the code samples or prefers-reduced-motion demo if you wish.

CSS deep-dive: matrix3d() for a frame-perfect custom scrollbar

I haven’t checked how accessible this is, and I’m torn on the concept of custom scrollbars, but this is interesting at the very least:

Custom scrollbars are extremely rare and that’s mostly due to the fact that scrollbars are one of the remaining bits on the web that are pretty much unstylable (I’m looking at you, date picker). You can use JavaScript to build your own, but that’s expensive, low fidelity and can feel laggy. In this article we will leverage some unconventional CSS matrices to build a custom scroller that doesn’t require any JavaScript while scrolling, just some setup code.

TL;DR:

You don’t care about the nitty gritty? You just want to look at the Nyan cat demo and get the library? You can find the demo’s code in our GitHub repo.

Building performant expand & collapse animations

Use scale transforms when animating clips. You can prevent the children from being stretched and skewed during the animation by counter-scaling them.

[…]

In this post we’re going to look over what’s involved if you want performant clip animations. If you want to see a demo, check out the Sample UI Elements GitHub repo.