Accessibility

Accessible websites are awesome websites

Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day - a great day to be talking about accessibility.

[…]

Accessibility is for everyone, it’s not an edge case.

Accessibility is cumulative not binary, the more you do for accessibility the more accessible your site is.

Use semantic HTML, browsers have a lot of accessibility built in.

Make things keyboard operable by using the keyboard from time to time when you’re developing.

Finally, you don’t have to ask permission to make things accessible.

Allow Ctrl- and Shift-clicking links in event handlers

I just recently updated a bunch of my click handlers to not act when the Ctrl or Shift keys are pressed during the click, so that links can be opened in new tabs or windows by the user if so wanted:

Code language: JavaScript

// Don't do anything and defer to the default action if a modifier key
// was pressed during the click (to open the link in a new tab, window,
// etc.) - note that this is a truthy check rather than a strict check
// for the existence of and boolean true value of the various event
// properties:
// * https://ambientimpact.com/web/snippets/conditional-statements-and-truthy-values-robust-client-side-javascript
// * https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/MouseEvent/ctrlKey
// * https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/MouseEvent/shiftKey
if (event.ctrlKey || event.shiftKey) {
	return;
}

The Accessibility of Styled Form Controls & Friends

A repository of styled and “styled” form control patterns, and how they are announced by screen readers.

Why?

Form controls are necessary in many interfaces, but are often considered annoying, if not downright difficult, to style. Many of the markup patterns presented here can serve as a baseline for building more attractive form controls without having to exclude users who may rely on assistive technology to get things done.

The A11Y Project

Accessibility can be a complex and difficult topic. The Accessibility Project understands this and wants to help make it easier to implement on the web. Our goal is to accomplish this with three principles in mind:

  1. Digestible. We strive to feature short, digestible pieces of content.
  2. Up-to-date. The project is hosted on GitHub so information can be current with the latest standards.
  3. Forgiving. People make mistakes, so we seek to be encouraging.

Container-Adapting Tabs With "More" Button

Image

This looks like an excellent, accessible starting point for the priority navigation pattern:

Or the priority navigation pattern, or progressively collapsing navigation menu. We can name it in at least three ways.

There are multiple UX solutions for tabs and menus and each of them have their own advantages over another, you just need to pick the best for the case you are trying to solve. At design and development agency Kollegorna we were debating on the most appropriate UX technique for tabs for our client’s website…

We agreed it should be a one-liner because the amount of tab items is unknown and narrowed our options down to two: horizontal scroll and adaptive with “more” button. Firstly, the problem with the former one is that horizontal scroll as a feature is not always visually obvious for users (especially for narrow elements like tabs) whereas what else can be more obvious than a button (“more”), right? Secondly, scrolling horizontally using a mouse-controlled device isn’t a very comfortable thing to do, so we might need to make our UI more complex with additional arrow buttons. All considered, we ended up choosing the later option[.]

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

May 17th is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. See the source link for more. The participate page is a great list of things to test for and be aware of.

The target audience of GAAD is the design, development, usability, and related communities who build, shape, fund and influence technology and its use. While people may be interested in the topic of making technology accessible and usable by persons with disabilities, the reality is that they often do not know how or where to start. Awareness comes first.