Libraries

px2svg: convert raster images to SVG

Turning raster images into SVG files, one pixel at a time. Yes, really.

What?

The PHP accepts a raster image (GIF, PNG, JPEG, that sort of thing) and creates an SVG image that recreates the raster image. It does this by drawing filled rectangles to recreate the pixels in the image. In many cases, this is literally a 1-by-1 rectangle, but it will check for runs of similar color (similar to GIF compression) and create one rectangle per run. It checks both horizontal and vertical runs to see which approach is more efficient, and returns the better option.

The script requires GD.

Why?

There are situations where people want to take small bitmaps—think primary-color buttons or badges—and make them scalable while still preserving their 8-bit appearance. See, for example, Joe Crawford’s post about upscaling a minitag. For those cases, this script will enable a quick conversion to SVG with at least some minimal attempts at optimization.

This all originally started as a one-off experiment and a bit of a jape. You can see the original at flaming-shame, if you fancy a laugh.

Introducing A11y Dialog

Almost all projects involve some form of dialog window at one point or another. However, accessibility is all too often set aside in favor of quick implementation. Truth is, accessible dialog windows are hard. Very hard.

Fortunately, there is a super clever guy named Greg Kraus who implemented an accessible modal dialog a few years ago and open-sourced it on GitHub. Now that’s nice!

However, his version—no matter how good it is—requires jQuery. We try to avoid using jQuery as much as we can here. We realised we did not really need it most of the time. On top of that, his script is not very flexible: only one dialog window per page, hard-coded IDs inside the functions. Not very practical and certainly not a drop-in script for any project.

So I rolled up my sleeves and improved it.

LayerSnap! Markup-based SVG Animations

Image

Every so often we come across parts of our designs that could really benefit from a smooth build animation or transition. Fortunately, we use a lot of SVG for delivering our vector graphics, so we have a great deal of animation flexibility at our disposal, and one tool we’ve enjoyed using for helping us animate our SVGs is SnapSVG, by Adobe. Snap is great, but takes a decent amount of JavaScript skill and tinkering to churn out an animation.

While working on some projects last year, we realized that if we had a more user-friendly, markup-based approach to configuring our SVG animations, we’d be more productive, and our clients could easily work with their own animations after hand-off as well. So we built an open-source tool!

Introducing LayerSnap

LayerSnap is a script that builds on top of Snap SVG to build simple SVG animations by editing the SVG markup’s attributes. It comes with a suite of pre-set build transitions like “fade”, “move-down”, “enter-left”, “rotate-right”, etc. It also has an “anvil” transition, because no animation toolkit is complete without an anvil transition. These transitions can be configured via an attribute on every group (g) element in an SVG, and a special syntax allows you to combine each transition with a host of configuration settings for their speed, delay, easing, looping, repeating, and even interactivity.

Demos, Docs, and more

This is our initial release of LayerSnap, so we expect it’ll have some issues here and there to work out. We’d love your help in testing it out. LayerSnap has a couple of dependencies (a CSS file and Snap SVG’s JavaScript), but you’ll notice our project demos include jQuery and some other utilities for cueing animations when they enter the viewport as you scroll. jQuery isn’t required by LayerSnap, but if you’re already using it in your project, you’ll find a helper script or two in the LayerSnap repo makes it easier to auto-run your animations.

Portier - an email-based, passwordless authentication service that you can host yourself

Portier (pronounced “Por-tee-ay”) is a self-hostable login service that you can use instead of passwords. Portier sits between your website and third-party services like Google Sign-In to provide your users the fastest and easiest login experience, without ever needing a new password.

Best of all, Portier works for everyone, because it can fall back to traditional “click the link” methods of email confirmation.

  • Email-first: Email addresses are decentralized, self-hostable, and useful on their own, so Portier uses email addresses instead of usernames to identify users.

  • Connected: Whenever possible, Portier integrates with major APIs like Google Sign-In to provide seamless, in-browser identity verification.

  • Decentralized: Anyone can host their own Portier Broker; there are no centralized dependencies.

  • Open and Transparent: Because Portier uses email addresses, there is never any lock-in.

Portier is inspired by many projects and considers itself a spiritual successor to Mozilla Persona.

Premonish - A library for predicting what element a user will interact with next.

Image

This is really cool. This library seems to use the pointer’s trajectory to predict what you’re heading towards, and highlights the appropriate cube. I suspect this only works with pointers that can be detected as moving, like mice and styluses that have that capability, but probably does nothing useful with touch in most cases. Either way, give it a shot, it’s eerie. The most obvious use case for this is to pre-load a link if the user starts to head for it, but of course that has the side effect of possibly wasting the user’s data if they’re on a capped connection.