UX

A/B testing can't tell you why a change is better

I think this is a good example of the is-ought problem in philosophy, transplanted into the world of software development:

A/B testing is a great way of finding out what happens when you introduce a change. But it can’t tell you why.

The problem is that, in a data-driven environment, decisions ultimately come down to whether something works or not. But just because something works, doesn’t mean it’s a good thing.

If I were trying to convince you to buy a product, or use a service, one way I could accomplish that would be to literally put a gun to your head. It would work. Except it’s not exactly a good solution, is it? But if we were to judge by the numbers (100% of people threatened with a gun did what we wanted), it would appear to be the right solution.

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Favicon Generator

Need a quick way to generate the necessary icons for your site, from the lowly favicon.ico to high resolution icons? I found this really helpful:

No hard decision

With so many platforms and icons, it’s hard to know exactly what you should do. What are the dimensions of favicon.ico? How many Touch icons do I need? RealFaviconGenerator did the reseach and testing for you.

Done in 5 minutes

You spent hours on design, colors, graphics… How much time left for the favicon? Probably not much. But no worries, you only need a few minutes to tackle this task.

Compelling design, a platform at a time

Each platform comes with its own design requirements. You can’t just use the same picture everywhere. RealFaviconGenerator knows this and lets you craft your icons platform per platform.

Instant feedback

How will Android display my icon? How will iOS round my Touch icon? No more guesswork. RealFaviconGenerator instantly shows you how your icons will look like.

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But sometimes links look like buttons (and buttons look like links)

In Resilient Web Design Jeremy Keith discusses the idea of material honesty. He says that “one material should not be used as a substitute for another, otherwise the end result is deceptive”.

Making a link look like a button is materially dishonest. It tells users that links and buttons are the same when they’re not.

In Buttons In Design Systems Nathan Curtis says that we should distinguish links from buttons because “button behaviours bring a whole host of distinct considerations from your simple anchor tag”.

For example, we can open a link in a new tab, copy the address or bookmark it for later. All of which we can’t do with buttons.

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CSS deep-dive: matrix3d() for a frame-perfect custom scrollbar

I haven’t checked how accessible this is, and I’m torn on the concept of custom scrollbars, but this is interesting at the very least:

Custom scrollbars are extremely rare and that’s mostly due to the fact that scrollbars are one of the remaining bits on the web that are pretty much unstylable (I’m looking at you, date picker). You can use JavaScript to build your own, but that’s expensive, low fidelity and can feel laggy. In this article we will leverage some unconventional CSS matrices to build a custom scroller that doesn’t require any JavaScript while scrolling, just some setup code.

TL;DR:

You don’t care about the nitty gritty? You just want to look at the Nyan cat demo and get the library? You can find the demo’s code in our GitHub repo.

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