Browsers - Chrome

Cutting the mustard with only CSS

JavaScript can be pretty brittle, so having a way to exclude browsers that don’t cut the mustard via CSS can be really useful, especially if you don’t want to serve them large amounts of CSS that they won’t properly understand. Since we can’t prevent loading a stylesheet via feature queries, the media attribute on a <link> element seems the next best thing. Andy Kirk has come up with a few combinations:

Code language: HTML

<!--
  Print (Edge doesn't apply to print otherwise)
  IE 10, 11
  Edge
  Chrome 29+, Opera 16+, Safari 6.1+, iOS 7+, Android ~4.4+
  FF 29+
-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="your-stylesheet.css" media="
  only print,
  only all and (-ms-high-contrast: none), only all and (-ms-high-contrast: active),
  only all and (pointer: fine), only all and (pointer: coarse), only all and (pointer: none),
  only all and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (min-color-index:0),
  only all and (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (min-resolution: 3e1dpcm)
">
 
<!--
  Print (Edge doesn't apply to print otherwise)
  Edge, Chrome 39+, Opera 26+, Safari 9+, iOS 9+, Android ~5+, Android UCBrowser ~11.8+
  FF 47+
-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="your-stylesheet.css" media="
  only print,
  only all and (pointer: fine), only all and (pointer: coarse), only all and (pointer: none),
  only all and (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (display-mode:browser), (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (display-mode:fullscreen)
">

Chrome is turning into the new Internet Explorer 6

I’m one of those weirdos who never switched to Chrome from Firefox, and the more marketshare Chrome has gained, the less inclined I am to use it for anything other than testing my sites in. I remember the days when Internet Explorer 6 was the assumed default, and I never want to see that again.

Microsoft might have celebrated the death of Internet Explorer 6, but if Google isn’t careful then it might just resurrect an ugly era of the internet where “works best with Chrome” is a modern nightmare.

Browse Against the Machine

[T]he web looks more and more like a feudal system, where the geography of the web has been partitioned off by the Frightful Five. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon are our lord and protectors, exacting a royal sum for our online behaviors. We’re the serfs and tenants, providing homage inside their walled fortresses. Noble upstarts are erased or subsumed under their existing order.