Browsers - Firefox

Cutting the mustard with only CSS

JavaScript can be pretty brittle, so having a way to exclude browsers that don’t cut the mustard via CSS can be really useful, especially if you don’t want to serve them large amounts of CSS that they won’t properly understand. Since we can’t prevent loading a stylesheet via feature queries, the media attribute on a <link> element seems the next best thing. Andy Kirk has come up with a few combinations:

Code language: HTML

<!--
    Print (Edge doesn't apply to print otherwise)
    IE 10, 11
    Edge
    Chrome 29+, Opera 16+, Safari 6.1+, iOS 7+, Android ~4.4+
    FF 29+
-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="your-stylesheet.css" media="
    only print,
    only all and (-ms-high-contrast: none), only all and (-ms-high-contrast: active),
    only all and (pointer: fine), only all and (pointer: coarse), only all and (pointer: none),
    only all and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (min-color-index:0),
    only all and (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (min-resolution: 3e1dpcm)
">
 
<!--
    Print (Edge doesn't apply to print otherwise)
    Edge, Chrome 39+, Opera 26+, Safari 9+, iOS 9+, Android ~5+, Android UCBrowser ~11.8+
    FF 47+
-->
<link rel="stylesheet" href="your-stylesheet.css" media="
    only print,
    only all and (pointer: fine), only all and (pointer: coarse), only all and (pointer: none),
    only all and (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (display-mode:browser), (min--moz-device-pixel-ratio:0) and (display-mode:fullscreen)
">

Go beyond console.log with the Firefox Debugger

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console.log is no debugger. It’s great for figuring out what your JavaScript app is up to, but it’s limited to spitting out a minimal amount of information. If your code is complex, you’ll need a proper debugger. That’s why we’ve added a new section to the Firefox Devtools Playground that’s all about debugging. We’ve built four basic lessons that use the Firefox Debugger to examine and repair a simple JavaScript to-do app.

The whole web at maximum FPS: How WebRender gets rid of jank

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Do you want a deep and nerdy dive into the web browser rendering and how the upcoming WebRender rendering engine for Firefox will use the GPU more like games currently do?

[T]here’s another big piece of Servo technology that’s not in Firefox Quantum quite yet, though it’s coming soon. That’s WebRender, which is being added to Firefox as part of the Quantum Render project.

Saying Goodbye to Firebug

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Firebug has been a phenomenal success. Over its 12-year lifespan, the open source tool developed a near cult following among web developers. When it came out in 2005, Firebug was the first tool to let programmers inspect, edit, and debug code right in the Firefox browser. It also let you monitor CSS, HTML, and JavaScript live in any web page, which was a huge step forward.

Firebug caught people’s attention — and more than a million loyal fans still use it today.

So it’s sad that Firebug is now reaching end-of-life in the Firefox browser, with the release of Firefox Quantum (version 57) next month. The good news is that all the capabilities of Firebug are now present in current Firefox Developer Tools.

The story of Firefox and Firebug is synonymous with the rise of the web. We fought the good fight and changed how developers inspect HTML and debug JS in the browser. Firebug ushered in the Web 2.0 era. Today, the work pioneered by the Firebug community over the last 12 years lives on in Firefox Developer Tools.

Browse Against the Machine

[T]he web looks more and more like a feudal system, where the geography of the web has been partitioned off by the Frightful Five. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon are our lord and protectors, exacting a royal sum for our online behaviors. We’re the serfs and tenants, providing homage inside their walled fortresses. Noble upstarts are erased or subsumed under their existing order.