Mozilla

Mozilla's Readability.js

A standalone version of the readability library used for Firefox Reader View.

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To parse a document, you must create a new Readability object from a document object, and then call parse(). Here’s an example:

var article = new Readability(document).parse();

This article object will contain the following properties:

  • title: article title
  • content: HTML string of processed article content
  • length: length of an article, in characters
  • excerpt: article description, or short excerpt from the content
  • byline: author metadata
  • dir: content direction

If you’re using Readability on the web, you will likely be able to use a document reference from elsewhere (e.g. fetched via XMLHttpRequest, in a same-origin <iframe> you have access to, etc.).

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Go beyond console.log with the Firefox Debugger

Promo art for the Firefox Debugger Playground: a styled insect with the words "go beyond console.log" below it.

console.log is no debugger. It’s great for figuring out what your JavaScript app is up to, but it’s limited to spitting out a minimal amount of information. If your code is complex, you’ll need a proper debugger. That’s why we’ve added a new section to the Firefox Devtools Playground that’s all about debugging. We’ve built four basic lessons that use the Firefox Debugger to examine and repair a simple JavaScript to-do app.

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The whole web at maximum FPS: How WebRender gets rid of jank

A cut away diagram of an aircraft engine, with various parts labelled with "Quantum Flow", 'Quantum DOM", "Quantum Compositor", "Quantum CSS (a.k.a. Stylo)", and "Quantum Render (feat. WebRender)".

Do you want a deep and nerdy dive into the web browser rendering and how the upcoming WebRender rendering engine for Firefox will use the GPU more like games currently do?

[T]here’s another big piece of Servo technology that’s not in Firefox Quantum quite yet, though it’s coming soon. That’s WebRender, which is being added to Firefox as part of the Quantum Render project.

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Browse Against the Machine

[T]he web looks more and more like a feudal system, where the geography of the web has been partitioned off by the Frightful Five. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple and Amazon are our lord and protectors, exacting a royal sum for our online behaviors. We’re the serfs and tenants, providing homage inside their walled fortresses. Noble upstarts are erased or subsumed under their existing order.

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