Snippets

These snippets are my attempt to save and organize various bits of code, best practices, and resources relating to web development and design. They also function as a to do list of sorts, for things I want to implement in my own code, but haven’t yet. The concept is inspired by Jeremy Keith’s links and CSS-Tricks, among other things. Enjoy.

What do programmers actually do?

This excellent video by Physics Girl breaks down some of the misconceptions about what we programmers actually do and why we do what we do, with a focus on women and femme people in the field. I could relate especially to the discussion about it being very much about enjoying problem solving.

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Stencil: A Compiler for Web Components

Stencil is a compiler that generates Web Components (more specifically, Custom Elements). Stencil combines the best concepts of the most popular frameworks into a simple build-time tool.

Stencil takes features such as

  • Virtual DOM
  • Async rendering (inspired by React Fiber)
  • Reactive data-binding
  • TypeScript
  • JSX

and then generates standards-based Web Components with these features baked in.

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Preventing downloading images or objects until they are visible in the viewport - WHATWG

This is an interesting discussion on the possibility of standardizing a way to request that the browser not load or delay loading images or objects. The key point that developers from the BBC stress is that for a non-zero number of users, JavaScript fails to run yet is enabled, so having a way to ensure they can still view images is important. As excellent as they can be, relying on on JavaScript solutions and serving non-functional markup can lead to broken pages in those cases since we don’t truly control our webpages.

See also: A standard way to lazy load images - WICG

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Taming huge collections of DOM nodes

Hajime Yamasaki Vukelic has come to the conclusion that, if you’re dealing with a really big number of DOM nodes that need to be updated in real time, frameworks are usually incredibly slow on top of the already-slow DOM operations you have to do. The solution they settled on is to avoid frameworks altogether for these scenarios and use vanilla JavaScript. Also of note are that repaints and reflows are going to be big bottlenecks regardless of what you use.

  • If you are looking for performance, don’t use frameworks. Period.
  • At the end of the day, DOM is slow.
  • Repaints and reflows are even slower.
  • Whatever performance you get out of your app, repaints and reflows are still going to be the last remaining bottleneck.
  • Keep the number of DOM nodes down.
  • Cache created DOM nodes, and use them as a pool of pre-assembled elements you can put back in the page as needed.
  • Logging the timings in IE/Edge console is unreliable because the developer tools have a noticeable performance hit.
  • Measure! Always measure performance first, then only fix the issues you’ve reliably identified.

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