Snippets

These snippets are my attempt to save and organize various bits of code, best practices, and resources relating to web development and design. They also function as a to do list of sorts, for things I want to implement in my own code, but haven’t yet. The concept is inspired by Jeremy Keith’s links and CSS-Tricks, among other things. Enjoy.

Serving old browsers limited JavaScript and CSS

The Guardian website viewed with Internet Explorer 8: a very basic document with little to no CSS applied.
The Guardian navigation as seen in Internet Explorer 8. Unsophisticated yet functional.
nature.com as viewed with Internet Explorer 9: a very simple layout without much CSS applied.
The nature.com homepage as seen in Internet Explorer 9.

Since we’re still stuck with a small percentage of users still on various versions of Internet Explorer and other older browsers, a good way to deal with those seems to be to only serve most or all of our JavaScript and CSS to browsers that cut the mustard, leaving the older set with a basic but functional experience, without risk that our newer, shiny stuff will inevitably break, or the need for polyfills that may or may not work.

See also: Cutting the mustard with only CSS

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1% or 13 million JavaScript requests per month to BuzzFeed time out

Ian Feather standing on a stage in front of a graphic that reads "13 million JavaScript requests will fail".

More evidence that we don’t fully control our web pages and that a non-zero number of page views don’t execute JavaScript fully or correctly, despite it being enabled.

Says @ianfeather at #AllDayHey — “our monitoring tells us that around 1% of requests for JavaScript on BuzzFeed timeout. That’s around 13 million requests per month.” A reminder if one were needed that we should design for resilience

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What do programmers actually do?

This excellent video by Physics Girl breaks down some of the misconceptions about what we programmers actually do and why we do what we do, with a focus on women and femme people in the field. I could relate especially to the discussion about it being very much about enjoying problem solving.

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Stencil: A Compiler for Web Components

Stencil is a compiler that generates Web Components (more specifically, Custom Elements). Stencil combines the best concepts of the most popular frameworks into a simple build-time tool.

Stencil takes features such as

  • Virtual DOM
  • Async rendering (inspired by React Fiber)
  • Reactive data-binding
  • TypeScript
  • JSX

and then generates standards-based Web Components with these features baked in.

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